Meeting of Creditors: Common Bankruptcy Trustee Questions

Find out what the bankruptcy trustee is likely to ask you at your meeting of creditors.

Updated by , Attorney

Most debtors want to know the types of questions the bankruptcy trustee will ask at the 341 creditors meeting. In this article, we explain:

  • why you must attend the 341 meeting of creditors
  • what happens at the meeting, and
  • the questions you can expect the trustee to ask at the Chapter 7 creditors meeting.

You'll find a link to the official list of 341 meeting of creditors questions at the end of the article.



What Is the Purpose of the Meeting of Creditors?

Before you can receive a discharge wiping out qualifying debt in bankruptcy, you must be examined under oath by a bankruptcy trustee at a hearing called the meeting of creditors or 341 hearing.

What Happens at the 341 Meeting of Creditors?

At the creditors' meeting, the bankruptcy trustee and any interested creditors can ask questions about your bankruptcy papers and financial affairs while you are under oath. The trustee's job is to ensure you aren't abusing the bankruptcy system or lying on your bankruptcy petition. Usually, your creditors' meeting will only last a few minutes.

Learn about the similarities and differences between the Chapter 7 bankruptcy meeting of creditors and the Chapter 13 creditors meeting.

Will I Answer Questions at the 341 Meeting of Creditors?

Yes. The trustee will ask you simple questions to ensure everything in your bankruptcy petition is complete and accurate. The trustee is required to ask standard questions of each debtor but might also ask specific questions about your case.

What Will the Trustee Ask Me About at the Meeting of Creditors?

The trustee can ask you about anything that could affect your bankruptcy. Because your bankruptcy is directly related to your financial situation, most questions involve your debts, assets, income, and expenses. The trustee will also look for other information that could increase recovery for your creditors.

If the information in your bankruptcy petition doesn't match your supporting documents, such as tax returns and paystubs, the trustee will question you about the discrepancies.

Common Bankruptcy Trustee Questions

The questions you'll be asked are somewhat predictable because trustees must ask about particular areas. The following are some of the most common trustee questions you'll be asked at the meeting of creditors:

  • Did you review your bankruptcy petition and schedules before you filed them with the court?
  • Is all the information in your bankruptcy papers true and correct to the best of your knowledge?
  • Did you disclose all of your assets?
  • Did you list all of your creditors?
  • Have you filed for bankruptcy before?
  • Has anything changed since filing your bankruptcy?
  • Are you required to pay a domestic support obligation such as alimony or child support?
  • Have you filed all tax returns as they have come due?
  • Have you made payments to a creditor exceeding $600 in the last year?
  • Have you transferred any property or given any security interests in the last two years?
  • Have you used any credit cards in the last year?
  • How did you calculate the value of your assets?
  • Do you own an interest in a business or partnership?
  • Are you the beneficiary, trustee, or trustor of a trust?
  • When was the last time you refinanced your house?

Would you like to see the specific questions you'll be asked? Here's where you'll find the official 341 meeting of creditors questions.

What Other Questions Might the Trustee Ask at the 341 Hearing?

The trustee will ask about any part of your bankruptcy case that appears unusual. Your bankruptcy lawyer will likely be able to predict specific questions the trustee might ask and, in many instances, resolve issues before the meeting takes place.

Need More Bankruptcy Help?

Did you know Nolo has been making the law easy for over fifty years? It's true—and we want to make sure you find what you need. Below you'll find more articles explaining how bankruptcy works. And don't forget that our bankruptcy homepage is the best place to start if you have other questions!

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Helpful Bankruptcy Sites

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We wholeheartedly encourage research and learning, but online articles can't address all bankruptcy issues or the facts of your case. The best way to protect your assets in bankruptcy is by hiring a local bankruptcy lawyer.

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