K-1 Fiance Visa Interview Questions

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One of the most nervewracking aspects of the fiancé visa application process is the interview at the U.S. consulate in your native country. This interview is usually the last hurdle to receiving a K-1 visa to enter the United States for the purpose of marrying your intended U.S. citizen spouse. However, the questions should be easy to answer if you know your fiancé well and are prepared ahead of your interview date.

If you are a U.S. citizen looking to bring your foreign fiancé to the U.S., please see Nolo’s “K-1 Fiance Visa” page for information about the application process.

Prepare for Your Visit

You should ensure that you are prepared for your visit to the U.S. consulate by bringing the necessary paperwork, submitting to a security clearance, and discussing potential interview questions with your U.S. fiancé or fiancée. Along with any U.S. State Department forms that the U.S. consulate (or National Visa Center) has requested, you should bring a copy of your entire K-1 application package -- that is, all the paperwork that your U.S. citizen spouse submitted on your behalf -- including the Form I-129F, Petition for Alien Fiancé(e), and all supporting documentation. To learn more about what to do in advance of your interview date, visit “Preparing for the Fiancé Visa Interview.”

The Purpose and Format of the Consular Interview

At your interview, the consular office will seek to learn more about your background and moral character, ascertain whether you know relevant details about your U.S. citizen fiancé(e), and determine whether or not your relationship with your future spouse is bona fide (genuine) and that you are marrying in good faith.

The consular officer will ask a few basic questions about you and your fiancé’s background and five to ten additional questions about your fiancé(e) and your relationship. It might take place in a separate room (space permitting) or at a window in a larger room in the consulate where you will speak with the consular officer (through a translator, if necessary). On average, the entire K-1 visa interview takes about 15 to 30 minutes.

Questions About Yourself and Your Background

In order to find out more about you and your intentions for entering the U.S., the consular officer might ask you:

  • Basic questions like your name, nationality, date of birth, and place of birth.
  • “Have you visited the U.S. before? If yes, when? For what purpose and on what type of visa?”
  • “Do you have any relatives living in the United States?”
  • “Have you ever been married before? How did that relationship end?”
  • “Do you have any children?” (Children accompanying you to the U.S. on a K-2 visa may be required to attend the interview.)
  • “Have you ever been sponsored for a K-1 visa before? If yes, what happened to that relationship?”
  • “Have you ever been arrested or convicted of a crime?”

Questions About Your Fiancé

The consular officer wants to know that you are truly interested in your intended spouse as a husband or wife and that you are aware of the relevant details of his or her life. Some examples are:

  • Basic questions like your fiance(e)’s full name, age, and birthday.
  • Living situation questions, such as: “Where does your fiancé(e) live? What type of home (apartment, house, etc.)? Does he or she rent or own?”
  • “What is his or her occupation?”
  • “Have you met your fiancé(e)’s parents? If no, why not?”
  • “Does he or she have any brothers and sisters? What are their names and ages? Have you met them?”
  • “What language(s) does your fiancé(e) speak?”
  • “What do you love about your fiancé(e)?”
  • “Has your fiancé(e) ever been married before? If yes, what happened to the relationship? Why did they divorce?”
  • “Does he or she have any children? If yes, what are their names and ages?”

Questions About Your Relationship and the Wedding

You will likely be asked about your wedding plans and how you met, fell in love, and why you decided to get married. You should be prepared for the following questions:

  • “How and where did you both meet?” (Remember, a meeting within the previous two years is a requirement of the K-1 visa, as described in “Legal Requirements for a K-1 Fiancé Visa.”)
  • “How long did you date before you got engaged?”
  • “What types of activities do you like to do together?”
  • “How many times have you met in person? Where and when?”
  • “How are you communicating during the long distance relationship? Is it difficult being apart?”
  • “Describe the engagement (proposal).”
  • “Have you met your fiancé(e)’s family? Has he or she met yours?”
  • “When and where will the wedding be held?”
  • “How many people will attend the wedding?”
  • “Why did you decide to get married in the United States?”
  • “Will your family be able to attend the wedding? If not, why not?”
  • “Do you have any plans for a honeymoon?”

The questions you are asked about your relationship will vary from case-to-case. If your case has anything unusual about it, or contains “red flags” that might lead the consular officer to question your motives for marrying or eligibility for a visa, you should be prepared to discuss those.

For instance, if there is a large age difference between you and your fiancé(e) or if your primary languages are different, you will likely be questioned on those details of your relationship. If your fiancé(e) sponsored another person for a green card or a K-1 visa in the past or if you have previously applied for a green card or K-1 visa based on a marriage or engagement to a U.S. citizen, expect to discuss those previous relationships. If you or your fiancé(e) have children from previous relationships, expect to be asked about where they will live and how they will blend into your new family.

Most of all, try to relax and just be yourself. You are very close to your brand new life in the United States with your husband- or wife-to-be!

For more information on the fiancé visa application process, as well as how to apply for a green card after you reach the U.S. and get married, see “Fiancé & Marriage Visas: A Couple's Guide to U.S. Immigration,” by Ilona Bray (Nolo).

 

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