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Launch Your Very Own LLC With Confidence

With 48 years of legal help, Nolo has you covered.

What Would You Like to Name Your LLC?

Packages from $49 (plus state filing fees)

Nolo's Filing Includes:

  • Company name validation
  • Articles of organization
  • Unlimited customer service support
  • Guide to formalizing your LLC
  • Automated error checking
  • And more...

It’s as Easy as 1, 2, 3

Package LLC
Step 1

Generate a Profile & Select Your Package

Answer a few questions for us to get to know your business better. We offer a number of packages for you to choose from. Select the one that works the absolute best for you.

LLC Describe
Step 2

Describe Your LLC

Fill out our easy-to-use step-by-step guide with all of the information needed to form your LLC in your selected state. Save your progress as you go, and file when you’re ready.

Launch LLC
Step 3

Start Doing Business!

Once you submit your order the rest is left to us. We'll handle all of the complicated documentation and filing so you don't have to.

Why Form an LLC?

Most business can benefit from forming a limited liability company (LLC), no matter what their size. Whether you want to form a multi-member LLC or a single-member LLC (SMLLC), this product can be tailored to fit your needs.

  • Members

    Single-member or multi-member ownership structure

  • Tax

    Owners can report profit & loss on their individual tax returns

  • Unlimited

    Limit your liability and protect your personal assets

  • Minutes

    Easy to run, fewer record keeping requirements

Plans
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What People Are Saying

  • star star star star star

    Super Easy LLC

    Super easy way to protect yourself at a low cost.

  • star star star star star

    Terrific!

    Great service! My LLC was formed quickly and the paperwork, I received in a few days. The price was reasonable too.

  • star star star star star

    Great Job

    Knowledgeable easy, competent and quickly filed.

Is an LLC Right For My Business?

Learn about the most common business ownership structures below

Overview

A limited liability company is a business ownership structure that separates your personal affairs from your business affairs.

Benefits

When set up properly, an LLC shields your personal assets from being taken to pay business debts or claims against the business, like a corporation.

An LLC has fewer formalities than a corporation: no stock, no board of directors, and no required annual meetings.

An LLC has easy pass-through taxation (like a sole proprietorship or partnership), where profits and losses are passed through to the owners and taxed on their personal income tax returns.

Disadvantages

An LLC can’t sell shares to the public or issue stock options.

Overview

A sole proprietorship is a one-owner business that has not been registered as a limited liability company, corporation, or any other type of legal entity.

Benefits

For IRS purposes, the owner (sole proprietor) and the business are one tax entity, meaning that business profits are reported and taxed on the owner's personal tax return.

Disadvantages

The main downside of a sole proprietorship is that its owner is personally liable for all business debts. This means that the owner is at risk of losing personal assets, such as a house, if the business is sued.

Overview

A partnership is a legal structure for a business of two or more individuals.

Benefits

Partners have pass-through taxation, where profits and losses are passed through to each partner's personal income tax returns.

Disadvantages

Each owner (partner) is personally liable for all debts of the business, and any partner can bind the partnership (and thus the other partners) to a business deal or contract.

Overview

A corporation is a structure that allows a business to organize as a separate legal entity from its owners (shareholders).

Benefits

An advantage of incorporating is that shareholders are legally shielded from personal liability for the corporation's liabilities and debts.

Disadvantages

Corporations are required to follow formalities such as issuing shares of stock, appointing a board of directors, and holding annual meetings.

And because a corporation is a separate legal entity from its owners, the company itself is taxed on all profits that it can't deduct as business expenses (including money kept in the company and money paid out as dividends).

Overview

A limited liability company is a business ownership structure that separates your personal affairs from your business affairs.

Benefits

When set up properly, an LLC shields your personal assets from being taken to pay business debts or claims against the business, like a corporation.

An LLC has fewer formalities than a corporation: no stock, no board of directors, and no required annual meetings.

An LLC has easy pass-through taxation (like a sole proprietorship or partnership), where profits and losses are passed through to the owners and taxed on their personal income tax returns.

Disadvantages

An LLC can’t sell shares to the public or issue stock options.

Overview

A sole proprietorship is a one-owner business that has not been registered as a limited liability company, corporation, or any other type of legal entity.

Benefits

For IRS purposes, the owner (sole proprietor) and the business are one tax entity, meaning that business profits are reported and taxed on the owner's personal tax return.

Disadvantages

The main downside of a sole proprietorship is that its owner is personally liable for all business debts. This means that the owner is at risk of losing personal assets, such as a house, if the business is sued.

Overview

A partnership is a legal structure for a business of two or more individuals.

Benefits

Partners have pass-through taxation, where profits and losses are passed through to each partner's personal income tax returns.

Disadvantages

Each owner (partner) is personally liable for all debts of the business, and any partner can bind the partnership (and thus the other partners) to a business deal or contract.

Overview

A corporation is a structure that allows a business to organize as a separate legal entity from its owners (shareholders).

Benefits

An advantage of incorporating is that shareholders are legally shielded from personal liability for the corporation's liabilities and debts.

Disadvantages

Corporations are required to follow formalities such as issuing shares of stock, appointing a board of directors, and holding annual meetings.

And because a corporation is a separate legal entity from its owners, the company itself is taxed on all profits that it can't deduct as business expenses (including money kept in the company and money paid out as dividends).

LLC FAQs

A business is free to form an LLC in any state, whether the LLC will do business there or not. But if you form your LLC out of state, you would still need to qualify your LLC to do business in your home state—and this means additional paperwork and additional fees. Most smaller LLCs that will operate in only one state form in the state they operate in, to avoid these hassles.
Another thing: If you form an LLC, and do business, in a state that's different from the state where all of its members live, be ready for some tax complications. The LLC members might have to pay personal income taxes in the other state on LLC income.
Also, keep in mind that not all states allow all businesses to be organized as LLCs. Some states won't let professionals, such as accountants, architects, and massage therapists, form LLCs.
Each state has different processing times. To find out your state's processing time, go to Nolo’s Online LLC FAQs page and choose your state.
LLCs are required to have a registered agent, an individual or company that agrees to accept legal papers on behalf of the LLC if it is sued. The registered agent must have a physical street address in the state where the LLC is registered. Commercial registered agent companies provide this service for an annual fee. An LLC member can also act as registered agent for the LLC, and in a few states the LLC itself can be the registered agent, but many LLCs prefer to turn over this important duty to professionals.
No. You can form an LLC by using Nolo's LLC formation service or filling out and filing the paperwork yourself. If you use Nolo's service, we will ask you the questions necessary to form an LLC and file the paperwork for you. If you have a complex question, you may want to consult a business lawyer or tax expert. And if you are trying to convert a corporation or partnership into an LLC, you should consult an attorney. There are some legal and tax ramifications to closing down an existing entity and starting a new one that are beyond the scope of our service.
LLCs ordinarily provide their owners with pass-through taxation. The profits (or losses) the business incurs "pass through" the business to the owner’s personal tax return. The profits are taxed at the owner’s personal tax rates. For single-member LLCs (SMLLCs), this means the owner reports the LLC's profits, losses, and deductions on IRS Schedule C. For multi-member LLCs, this means filing partnership tax forms. Because LLCs are usually pass-through entities, their owners can qualify for the special pass-through tax deduction created by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.
Both corporations and LLCs provide their owners with limited liability. But LLCs require less paperwork to set up and maintain, and are ordinarily taxed like sole proprietorships or partnerships. In addition, LLC owners do not work as employees of the LLC—they are self-employed business owners. Corporate shareholders who work for the corporation must be treated like employees of the corporation.
A sole proprietor personally owns a business and all its assets. There is no separate business entity involved, so the sole proprietor is personally liable for all business debts and lawsuits. This means that creditors or lawsuit plaintiffs can reach the proprietor’s personal assets to satisfy a debt or judgment.
An LLC, on the other hand, is a separate business entity. The LLC owns the business and all of its assets. The LLC members—the owners of the LLC—run the LLC. The LLC members ordinarily are not personally liable for LLC debts and lawsuits.
Your state doesn't require you to file a written operating agreement, but you shouldn't consider starting business without one. Here's why an operating agreement is necessary:
  • It helps to ensure that courts will respect your personal liability protection by showing you have been conscientious about organizing your LLC.
  • It sets out rules that govern how profits will be split up, how major business decisions will be made, and the procedures for handling the departure and addition of members.
  • It helps to avert misunderstandings among the owners over finances and management.
  • It allows you to create your own operating rules rather than being governed by the default rules in your state's LLC laws, which might not be to your benefit.
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