New USCIS Policy Affects Timing of Medical Exam (Form I-693) for Applicants to Adjust Status

In the latest attempt at a workable policy, which goes into effect on November 1, 2018, USCIS will require applicants to submit a Form I-693 that was prepared and signed by a civil surgeon no more than 60 days (approximately two months) before filing the application for adjustment (or any other immigration benefit).

** LEGAL UPDATE **

As part of the process of applying for a green card (U.S. lawful permanent residence) applicants must have a medical exam report prepared by an authorized physician (a "civil surgeon").

How long the results will be considered valid, however, has been a subject of often-changing government policy, particularly as concerns applicants within the U.S. using the procedure known as "adjustment of status."

The issue is that, due to backlogs at U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), the exam may be months old and possibly even invalid by the time the person's case is actually reviewed and considered, which often happens in the context of a green-card interview. In that case, USCIS could ask the applicant to go through the trouble and expense of another medical exam.

In the latest attempt at a workable policy, which goes into effect on November 1, 2018, USCIS will require applicants to submit a Form I-693 that was prepared and signed by a civil surgeon no more than 60 days (approximately two months) before filing the application for adjustment (or any other immigration benefit).

The Form I-693 will remain valid for two years following the signature date.

This doesn't mean it's impossible that you'll be asked to submit a second medical exam report. USCIS officers can still request a new Form I-693 if they have cause to you may be inadmissible on health-related grounds. For example, this might occur if a new DUI arrest raises questions about whether you have an alcohol or drug addiction.

Effective Date: November 1, 2018