Getting Your Home Back After a Property Tax Sale in Mississippi

Mississippi law provides a two-year redemption period after a tax sale, during which you can pay off the tax debt and prevent the purchaser from getting your home.

If you don’t pay your Mississippi property taxes, you could eventually lose your home. You will, however, get a lengthy time period (called a “redemption period”) during which you can get caught up on the delinquent amounts before this happens. Because of the long redemption period, it is very rare for a homeowner to actually lose his or her home to a tax sale in Mississippi. Still, you need to be aware of the redemption deadline and make sure you get paid up on time, otherwise you’ll be out of luck.

What Happens at a Mississippi Tax Sale?

In Mississippi, a tax sale will eventually take place if you don’t pay the property taxes on your home. The purchaser (who is the high bidder at an auction) receives a receipt along with the right to eventually get ownership of your property if you don’t pay off the debt. Paying off the debt is known as “redeeming” the property. (For more information on the tax sale process in Mississippi, see  What Happens If I Don't Pay Property Taxes in Mississippi.)

Redemption Period After a Tax Sale in Mississippi

Under Mississippi law, you generally get a two-year redemption period after the sale. During this time, you can pay off the tax debt and prevent the purchaser from getting your home (Miss. Code Ann. § § 27-45-3, 21-33-61).

Certain homeowners get additional time to redeem.  Minors and persons of “unsound mind” who lose their home to the tax sale get the right to redeem for two years after attaining full age or being restored to sanity (Miss. Code Ann. § § 27-45-3, 21-33-61).

Amount You Must Pay to Keep Your Home

To redeem your home after the sale, you must pay the following redemption amount to the chancery clerk (regardless of the amount of the purchaser's bid at the tax sale):

  • the amount of taxes due plus 5%
  • sale costs
  • interest on the taxes and costs at the rate of 1.5% per month (or any fraction thereof) from the sale date, and
  • all costs that have accrued on the property since the sale plus interest from the date the costs accrued at the rate of 1.5% per month (or any fraction thereof)(Miss. Code Ann. § 27-45-3).

Certain homeowners must also pay for any improvements to the property to redeem.  In addition to the redemption amount, minors and persons of unsound mind must pay the value of any permanent improvements that the purchaser made to the property after the expiration of two years from the sale date (Miss. Code Ann. § § 27-45-3, 21-33-61).

How to Lower Your Property Taxes in Mississippi Before You Fall Behind

Though Mississippi law gives you two years to redeem your home before you lose it to the purchaser from the tax sale, it is probably better to attempt to make your taxes affordable before you fall delinquent. For instance, you could:

Where to Read Mississippi’s Tax Sale Laws

To read the statutes that discuss tax sales and the redemption period after a tax sale in Mississippi, go to Titles 21 and 27, § § 21-33-1 through 21-33-91, 27-41-1 through 27-41-89, and 27-45-1 through 27-45-29 of the  Mississippi Code.

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