Getting Your Home Back After a Property Tax Sale in Mississippi

Under Mississippi law, you get a two-year redemption period after a tax sale.

If you don’t pay your Mississippi property taxes, state law allows the county treasurer to collect the delinquent amount by selling the debt in a tax lien sale. After a tax lien sale happens, if you don’t get caught up on the overdue amounts, the person or entity that bought the debt can eventually get ownership of your home.

Fortunately, you'll have the opportunity to save your home by “redeeming it”—that is, getting current on the past-due taxes, plus interest and various costs.

How Mississippi Tax Sales Work

In Mississippi, a tax sale will eventually take place if you don’t pay the property taxes on your home. At the sale, the winning bidder buys the tax debt and gets a lien on the property. The purchaser receives a receipt along with the right to eventually get ownership of your property if you don’t pay off the debt. (For more information on the tax sale process in Mississippi, see What Happens If I Don't Pay Property Taxes in Mississippi.)

Redemption Period After a Tax Sale in Mississippi

Under Mississippi law, most people get a two-year redemption period after the sale. During this time, you can pay off the tax debt and prevent the purchaser from getting title to your home. (Miss. Code Ann. § 27-45-3, § 21-33-61). At the end of the redemption period, if you haven’t paid off the overdue amounts, the purchaser can get a tax deed (title) to your home.

Some Homeowners Get More Time to Redeem

Minors and persons of unsound mind who lose their home to the tax sale get the right to redeem for two years after attaining full age or being restored to sanity. (Miss. Code Ann. § 27-45-3, § 21-33-61).

How Much It Costs to Redeem Your Home After a Tax Sale

To redeem your home after the sale, you have to pay the following redemption amount to the chancery clerk, regardless of the amount of the purchaser's bid at the tax sale:

  • the amount of taxes due plus 5%
  • sale costs
  • interest on the taxes and costs at the rate of 1.5% per month (or any fraction thereof) from the sale date, and
  • all costs that have accrued on the property since the sale, plus interest from the date the costs accrued at the rate of 1.5% per month or any fraction thereof. (Miss. Code Ann. § 27-45-3).

Minors and persons of unsound mind who attain full age or are restored to sanity and want to redeem must also pay the value of any permanent improvements that the purchaser made to the property after the expiration of two years from the sale date. (Miss. Code Ann. § 27-45-3, § 21-33-61).

Avoiding a Tax Lien on Your Mississippi Home

Even though you’ll get some time to redeem your Mississippi home after a tax sale, in most cases, it's better to take action earlier to try to make your taxes more affordable. For instance, before you fall behind in your taxes, you could:

  • look into whether you meet the criteria for a property tax abatement, or
  • challenge the taxable value of your home, if you think it's incorrect.

Getting Help Redeeming Your Mississippi Home

If you want more information about property tax and redemption laws in Mississippi, consider talking to a foreclosure lawyer, a real estate lawyer, or a tax lawyer.

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