When You Need Permission to Use Trademarks

You don't need it for editorial or informational uses

A trademark is any word, photograph, or symbol that is used to identify specific products or services. Permission is not required to use a trademark if:

  • your use is for informational or editorial purposes—for instance, you use the trademark as part of an article or story, or
  • your use is part of accurate comparative product statements.

Informational Uses

Informational (or “editorial”) uses of a trademark do not require permission. These are uses that inform, educate, or express opinions protected under the First Amendment of the United States Constitution—freedom of speech and of the press. For example, permission is not required to use the Chevrolet logo in an article describing Chevrolet trucks, even if the article is critical of the company. Similarly, if you are making a documentary film on the history of American trucks, you do not need permission to include the Chevrolet logo. However, the use of the logo must have some relevance to the work. For example, it would not be wise to publish an article critical of overseas auto manufacturing practices and include the Chevrolet logo unless Chevrolet were mentioned in the article.

Using TM symbols

When using a trademark in text for informational purposes, it is not necessary to include the

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