Consequences of Paying Rent Late in Kansas

Paying rent late in Kansas can cost you money--and possibly your tenancy.

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Landlord & Tenant Books and Forms

Your lease or rental agreement and Kansas state law are the key places to look for answers to this question. Basically, if you pay rent late, you may be hit with a late fee and possibly face the termination of your tenancy. To avoid problems, know when your rent is due and pay it on time.

Read the Rent and Termination Clauses in Your Lease or Rental Agreement

Look for a clause called Payment of Rent, or something similar. Basically, you want to find out the following:

  • the date that rent is due—this is usually the first of the month (and this is the date the landlord receives your rent payment, not the date that the envelope with your mailed rent check is postmarked)
  • what happens if the first of the month falls on a weekend or holiday (your lease may give you until the next business day to pay rent)
  • whether or not you have a grace period before rent is considered late, and
  • whether or not your landlord will charge you a late fee (and how much) if you don’t pay rent on time (Kansas law does not cover late fees or set a late fee limit, as some states do, so it’s a matter of what your lease or rental agreement says on the subject).

You’ll also want to check what your lease says regarding the landlord’s right to terminate your entire tenancy if you pay rent late. Unfortunately, many lease and rental agreements don’t spell this out, but simply include a general clause called something like Grounds for Termination of Tenancy, that states that if you fail to comply with a term of your agreement the landlord may terminate your tenancy under rules and procedures required by law. Read on to find out what these rules and procedures are in Kansas.

Understand Tenant Rights Under Kansas Laws on Termination for Nonpayment of Rent

If you have not paid the rent on time, under state law in Kansas (Kan. Rev. Stat. §§ 58-2507, 58-2508, and 58-2564(b)), the amount of time your landlord must give you in which to pay the rent or move depends upon on how long you have been living in your rental rent.  If it’s more than three months, your landlord must give you at least ten days’ notice (if your tenancy has been less than three months, your landlord need only give you three days’ notice). If you don’t pay rent or move within the specified amount of time, your landlord can file a lawsuit to evict you.

More Information on Tenant Rent Rights in Kansas

For details on other Kansas rent-related laws, such as the amount of notice a landlord must give to raise the rent, see the Nolo article on Kansas rent rules. And if you simply can’t pay rent on time, consider other options, such as trying to negotiate a partial rent payment. See the Nolo article What to Do and Not to Do if You Can’t Pay Rent on Time for advice.

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