Robinson Hungate, P.C.

Robinson Hungate, P.C.

Robinson Hungate, P.C. is an established Colorado law firm with decades of combined legal experience.

Firm Overview

Our attorneys help clients with business formation and litigation, construction law, construction contracts, mechanic's liens, real estate, property boundaries, land access, estate planning, trust and probate litigation, mediation, and collections law. We also practice special education law.

Our clients in the Denver-Boulder area expect and receive practical solutions that take full advantage of our expertise in these areas. They value the senior and personal attention only a lawyer in a small firm can provide.

Each attorney in our firm practices law in a landscape of respect, integrity and collegiality. Our work is driven by our clients' unique needs and goals. We keep this thought in mind, believing that no two matters are ever the same even those regarded by some as small or routine. This approach to the profession gives us pride in our work, and in the trust placed in us.
Main Office
Main Office
4999 Pearl East Circle, Suite 201
Boulder  CO  80301
Phone
  • 303-939-9794
Fax
Websites
Real Estate
Real estate transactions are complex matters often involving multiple parties and numerous issues beyond the property description and the sale price.
While the parties to commercial transactions are typically sophisticated, those buying and selling residential property often have little experience despite the significance of the event. The help of a real estate attorney can save considerable costs down the road.

Real Estate Transactions
Real estate transactions are complex matters often involving multiple parties and numerous issues beyond the property description and the sale price. While the parties to commercial transactions are typically sophisticated, those buying and selling residential property often have little experience despite the significance of the event. Besides the parties themselves, participants in real estate deals include realtors, lenders, title companies, home inspectors and surveyors, among others. Although realtors may be helpful to the buyer or seller, they are seldom in a position to represent either side's legal interests that is the role of a real estate attorney. Realtors also have a financial investment in the transaction inasmuch as their commissions are based upon the sale price. Sound and timely advice from counsel knowledgeable about matters including contract terms, title issues and inspection/disclosure questions can minimize problems, for both commercial and residential transactions.

Boundary Disputes
The physical extent of ownership of real property is defined by the boundary lines of that property and, despite the best efforts of realtors, lawyers and surveyors, it is not always easy to tell where one person's property ends and another's begins leading to boundary disputes. This is particularly true where owners have constructed improvements such as fences on the wrong side of the legal boundaries, or have used someone else's property as their own for an extended period of time. Boundary litigation is usually complex, requiring reconstruction of historical events and review of old surveys, often going back decades. Other forms of boundary disputes involve incorrect property descriptions and errors in surveying.

Land Access Disputes
In the "bundle of sticks" that comprise real property ownership, one of the most important is access. Without legal access to the land, use of property may be stymied and its value significantly diminished. While urban and suburban developments have clearly defined streets and roads established by recorded plots, the legal right to access rural or mountain property not contiguous to public highways is usually less certain. Without a legal document creating a right of access to land such as an easement, litigation sometimes becomes necessary to establish that right. This is done under various legal theories such as easements by necessity, or prescriptive easements. In recent years with mountain property values increasing significantly, litigants have also asserted claims that particular routes are public roads based on historical use. Land access litigation is a complicated area of the law that can require historical research dating back more than a century, particularly if mining claims are involved.

Meghan C. Hungate

Associate attorney Meghan received her law degree from the University of Colorado School of Law in 2006. Prior to joining Robinson Tweedy in 2008, Meghan clerked for Judges Dan Hale and Gwyneth Whalen of the Boulder County District Court, where she experienced the inner-workings of both the criminal and civil court systems. She enjoys the intricacy of construction law, collections law, mechanic's liens, and real estate litigation, and the challenges presented for both the legal system and our clients. Meghan works hard to reach workable solutions for our clients in the Denver/Boulder area, and beyond.

Meghan received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Spanish and Political Science from Duquesne University, where she also played on the women's lacrosse team. Now very grateful to be living and practicing in Boulder, Meghan takes advantage of the great outdoors and the sports of each season.

Ken Robinson

Ken Robinson has been a practicing lawyer in the Denver/Boulder area for over twenty-five years, focusing his law practice on land access, construction law, mechanic's liens, real estate and collections cases. Before opening his solo practice in Boulder in 1999, he was a partner in the construction law firm of Wells, Love and Scoby in Boulder. His practice as an attorney emphasizes design and construction litigation, construction contracts and documentation, mechanic's liens, real estate litigation, and real property boundary and access disputes.

Ken is a graduate of the School of Law at the University of Colorado. He holds engineering degrees from both Brown and Cornell universities. As an undergraduate, he was inducted into Tau Beta Pi, the honorary engineering society.

An author and lecturer on the subject of construction law, Ken also handles construction law arbitrations under the auspices of the American Arbitration Association. He is a member of the Colorado Bar, the American Bar Association, the National Society of Professional Engineers, and he is a Registered Professional Engineer (inactive) in the State of Colorado. He holds an AV peer rating from Martindale-Hubbell.

Prior to his legal career, Ken consulted as an environmental engineer.

Off the job, he spends as much time as he can in the mountains, in Maui or dancing Argentine Tango.

John Seebohm

John is a 1985 graduate of the University of Colorado School of Law with more than twenty-five years of experience practicing law. John's practice focuses on contested matters involving wills, trusts, probate, fiduciaries and closely held LLCs, partnerships and corporations. John also prepares wills, trusts and related planning documents, and assists clients in the formation of business entities. John has extensive experience in all phases of litigation and dispute resolution, and in business and succession planning. John applies his many years of experience to help clients achieve cost-effective solutions. John is an "AV" peer review attorney as rated by Martindale-Hubbell, the highest rating available. John is admitted to practice in state courts in Colorado and California, and in federal courts in Colorado. John is a member of the American, Colorado, Denver and Boulder County Bar Associations.

When not practicing law, John is an avid alpinist, skier and trail runner.

Lucy Kennedy Walker

Associate attorney Lucy is a graduate of Brown University and Boston College Law School. As a law student, Lucy worked in several clinics, acting as a student attorney for low-income clients in civil litigation and juvenile rights cases. Lucy graduated cum laude with a special certificate in environmental and land use law and earned a dean's award for her clinical work.

Lucy is also a regular volunteer at the Native American Rights Fund where she works with the National Indian Law Library in Boulder. She has previously worked pro-bono for the Navajo Nation and clerked for California Indian Legal Services and the United States Department of the Interior, focusing in federal Indian law. Lucy is also a member of the Colorado Indian Bar Association.

A recent transplant to the Centennial State, Lucy enjoys backpacking in the great outdoors when the weather is cooperative, and boxing indoors when it is not.
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